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The Complete Mahabharata in English (12 Volumes)
The Complete Mahabharata in English (12 Volumes)
The Complete Mahabharata in English (12 Volumes)
The Complete Mahabharata in English (12 Volumes)
The Complete Mahabharata in English (12 Volumes)

The Complete Mahabharata in English (12 Volumes)

$325.00
Description

Specifications:

  • Dimensions:10.0' X 6.5'
  • Edition:2003
  • Author:Kisari Mohan Ganguly
  • Publisher:Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd.
  • ISBN:812150094X
  • Cover Type:Hardcover
  • Number of Pages:4900
  • From the Jacket

    The Mahabharata in its present form is equal to about eight times as much as the Illiad and Odyssey put together. The nucleus of the Mahabharata is the great war of eighteen days fought between the, Kauravas, the hundred sons of Dhritarashtra and Pandavas, the five sons of Pandu. The epic entails all the circumstances leading upto the war. In this great Kurukshetra battle were involved almost all the kings of India joining either of the two parties. The result of this war was the total annihilation of Kauravas and their party, and Yudhishthira, the head of the Pandavas, became the sovereign monarch of Hastinapura, symbolizing the victory of good over evil. But the progress of the years new matters and episodes relating to the various aspects of hanuman life, social, economic, political, moral and religious as also fragments of other heroic legends came to be added to the aforesaid nucleus and this phenomenon continued for centuries until it acquired the present shape.

    This very fact that the Mahabharata represents a whole literature rather than one single and unified work, and contains so many and so multifarious things, makes it more suited than any other book of afford us an insight into the deepest depths of the soul of Indian people.

     

    About the Book

    In the world of classical literature the Mahabharata is unique in many respects. As an epic, it is the greatest-seven times as great as the Illiad and the Odyssey combined, and the grandest-animating the heart of India over two thousand years past and destined to lead humanity for thousands of years in future. It is the mightiest single endeavour of literary creation of any culture in human history. The effort to conceive the mind that conceived it is itself a liberal education and a walk through its table of contents is more than a Sabbath day's Journey.

    The translation was completed and serially published in thirteen years from AD 1883 to 1896 in one hundred fasciculi. The original edition was out of print within the lifetime of Mr. Ganguli, and is made available once again.

     

    About the Author

    Kisari Mohan Ganguli completed the translation of Mahabharata and serially published in thirteen years from AD 1883 to 1896 in one hundred fasciculi.

    Ganguli preferred public anonymity till compilation. But from the very beginning though anonymous to the general readers, the authorship of Ganguli was not secret to the numerous oriental scholars and patrons of the enterprise, Indian and foreign with whom he was constantly linked through direct contact or correspondence. The then Central Government also recognised the services of Ganguli as the translator of this great work by conferring the C.I.E. titles and awarding the first Honorary Literary Person for life to him.

     

    TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE

    The object of a translator should ever be to hold the mirror upto his author. That being so, his chief duty is to represent so far as practicable the manner in which his author's ideas have been expressed, retaining if possible at the sacrifice of idiom and taste all the peculiarities of his author's imagery and of language as well. In regard to translations from the Sanskrit, nothing is easier than to dish up Hindu ideas, so as to make them agreeable to English taste. But the endeavourof the present translator has been to give in the following pages as literal a renderingas possible of the great work of Vyasa, To the purely English reader there is much in the following pages that will strike as ridiculous. Those unacquainted with any language but their own are generally very exclusive in matters of taste. Having no knowledge of models other than what they meet with in their own tongue, the standard they have formed of purity and taste in composition must necessarily be a narrow one. The translator, however, would ill-discharge his duty, if for the sake of avoiding ridicule, he sacrificed fidelity to the original. He must represent his author as he is, not as he should be to please the narrow taste of those entirely unacquainted with him. Mr. Pickford, in the preface to his English translation of the Mahavira Charita, ably defends a close adherence to the original even at the sacrifice of idiom and taste against the clairns of what has been called 'Free Translation,' which means dressing the author in an outlandish garb to please those to whom he is introduced.

    In the preface to his classical translation of Bhartrihari's NitiSatakamand Vairagya Satakam, Mr. C.H. Tawney says, I am sensible that in the present attempt I have retained much local colouring. For instance, the ideas of worshipping the feet of a god of great men, though it frequently occurs in Indian literature, will undoubtedly move the laughter of Englishmen unacquainted with Sanskrit, especially if they happen to belong to that class of readers who revel their attention on the accidental and remain blind to the essential. Buta certain measure of fidelity to the original even at the risk of making oneself ridiculous, is better than the studied dishonesty which characterises so many translations of oriental poets.

    We fully subscribe to the above although, it must be observed, the censure conveyed to the class of translators last indicated is rather undeserved, there being nothing like a 'studied dishonesty' in their efforts which proceed only from a mistaken view of their duties and as such betray only an error of the head but not of the heart.

     

    PUBLISHER'S PREFACE

    In the world of classical literature the Mahabharata is unique in many respects. As an epic, it is the greatest-seven times as great as the Iliad and the Odyssey combined, and the grandest-animating the heart of India over two thousand years past and destined to lead humanity for thousands of years in future. It is the mightiest single endeavour of literary creation of any culture in human history. The effort to conceive the mind that conceived it is itself a liberal education and a walk through its table of contents is more than a Sabbath day's journey.

    The Western world was long acquainted with the epic rather superficially through the transcribed fragments of Bopp, Fauche, Romesh Dutta, Monier- Williams, etc.: But the task of making it fully accessible for the first time to men of this age fell upon late Kisari Mohan Ganguli towards the end of the nineteenth century. Dr. Reynold Rost of India Office Library incidentally wrote about the crying need for an English version, complete and authentic, of the original Mahabharata to Mr. Pratap Chandra Roy, a leading bookseller and publisher of Calcutta in those days renowned for publishing ancient Indian classics. He was almost dissuaded from the mighty project for its fantastic difficulties. As Mrs. Sundari Bala Roy, the widow of Pratap Chandra Roy, wrote elsewhere, Some said it was impossible, some said it was offensive to Hindu religion. When my husband approached Pandit Iswara Chandra Vidyasagar, he laughed outright and doubted my husband's sanity- Whence was the money to come? Where could a competent translator be had having such patience, if uniformity of style was to be secured?-was his remark. Now that the works have been completed. alas, where are both my husband and Vidyasagar today?

    The translation was completed and serially published in thirteen years, from AD 1883 to 1896, in one hundred fasciculi. Those covering first fourteen 'Parvas' were published by Pratap Chandra Roy and the last four 'Parvas' by his widow Mrs. Sundari Bala Roy after his death. Considering the unique nature of the undertaking, vast and difficult beyond conception and baffling all similar attempts' previously made by others both in India and abroad, Ganguli preferred public anonymity till completion. Accordingly the fasciculi were published initially withholding the translator's name and finally declaring the same in the last fascicule both by Mrs. Roy as its publisher and Ganguli as the sole translator. But from the very beginning though anonymous to the general readers, the authorship of Ganguli was not secret to the numerous Oriental scholars and patrons of the enterprise, Indian and foreign with whom he was constantly linked through direct contact or correspondence. The then Central Government also recognised the services of Roy as the publisher and of Ganguli as the translator of this great works by conferring the C.I.E. title and awarding the first Honorary Literary Person for Life to them respectively.

    The original edition was out of print within the lifetime of Ganguli. First Mr. Roy and then Mrs. Roy had already died without any issue; and Ganguli did not live too long to arrange for the publication of another edition. It now transpires that during the second decade of last century a publishing concern of Calcutta printed and published, in the most irresponsible manner, a new edition ignoring the authorship of Ganguli and describing P.C. Roy as the translator with much distortions and mutilations of the original edition. From them it passed to another concern in the same form, from whom at last we took the responsibility of publishing it. But unfortunately we committed out of inadvertence the same blunders as our predecessors. Very recently our attention was drawn by the translator's heir to the incongruities in our publication; and after going through the original edition in the National Library, Calcutta, and having been convinced that gross injustice was being done to the honour of the noble soul of the departed author, we have promptly arranged to publish anew, with true authorship and necessary rectifications, this world-famous work in its original from.

     

    CONTENTS

    VOLUME - I

     

    Preface v
    SECTION I
    Introductory
    1
    SECTION II
    Parva Sangraha
    15
    SECTION III
    Paushya Parva
    32
    SECTION IV-XII
    Pauloma Parva
    44
    SECTION XIII-LVIII
    Astika Parva
    53
    SECTION LIX-LXIV
    Adivansavatarana Parva
    116
    SECTION LXV-CXLII
    Sambhava Parva
    132
    SECTION CXLIII-CLIII
    Jatugriha Parva
    302
    SECTION CLIV-CLVIII
    Hidimva-vadha Parva
    317
    SECTION CLIX-CLXVI
    Vaka-vadha Parva
    326
    SECTION CLXVII-CLXXXV
    Chaitraratha Parva
    337
    SECTION CLXXXVI-CLXLIV
    Swayamvara Parva
    369
    SECTION CLXLV-CCI
    Vaivahika Parva
    383
    SECTION CCII-CCIX
    Viduragamana Parva
    396
    SECTION CCX-CCXIV
    Rajya-labha Parva
    408
    SECTION CCXV-CCXX
    Arjuna-vanavasa Parva
    416
    SECTION CCXXI-CCXXII
    Subhadra-harana Parva
    425
    SECTION CCXXIII
    Haranaharana Parva
    428
    SECTION CCXXIV-CCXXXVI
    Khandava-daha Parva
    432

     

    VOLUME - II

     

    Publisher's Preface v
    SABHA PARVA  
    SECTION I-IV
    Sabhakriya Parva
    1
    SECTION V-XIII
    Lokapala Sabhakhyana Parva
    8
    SECTION XIV-XIX
    Rajasuyarambha Parva
    32
    SECTION XX-XXIV
    Jarasandha-badha Parva
    44
    SECTION XXV-XXXI
    Digvijaya Parva
    56
    SECTION XXXII-XXXIV
    Rajasuyika Parva
    67
    SECTION XXXV-XXXVII
    Arghyaharana Parva
    73
    SECTION XXXIX-XLIV
    Sisupala-badha Parva
    80
    SECTION XLV-LXXX
    Dyuta Parva

     

    91
    VANA PARVA  
    SECTION I-X
    Aranyaka Parva
    1
    SECTION XI-XII
    Kirmirabadha Parva
    23
    SECTION XII-XXXVII
    Arjunabhigamana Parva
    27
    SECTION XXXVIII-XLI
    Kairata Parva
    84
    SECTION XLII-LI
    Indralokagamana Parva
    94
    SECTION LII-LXXIX
    Nalopakhyana Parva
    111
    SECTION LXXX-CXIII
    Tirtha-yatra Parva
    164

     

    VOLUME - III

     

    Publisher's Preface v
    VANA PARVA (Part II)  
    SECTION CXIV-CLXXX
    Tirtha-yatra Parva (Continued)
    245
    SECTION CLXXXI-CCXXX
    Markandeya-Samsya Parva
    364
    SECTION CCXXXI-CCXXXIII
    Draupadi-Satyabhama Samvada
    472
    SECTION CCXXXIV-CCLX
    Ghosha-yatra Parva
    477
    SECTION CCLXI-CCLXL
    Draupadi-harana Parva
    515
    SECTION CCLXLI-CCCVIII
    Pativrata-mahatmya Parva
    570
    SECTION CCCIX-CCCXIII
    Aranya Parva
    600

     

    VOLUME IV

     

    Preface v
    VIRATA PARVA  
    SECTION I-XII
    Pandava-Pravesa Parva
    1
    SECTION XIII
    Samayapalana Parva
    20
    SECTION XIV-XXV
    Kichaka-Vadha Parva
    23
    SECTION XXVI-LXXII
    Go-harana Parva
    49
    UDYOGA PARVA  
    SECTION I-XL
    Sainyodyoga Parva
    1
    SECTION XLI-LXXI
    Sanat-Sujata Parva
    91
    SECTION LXXII-CLX
    Bhagawat Yana Parva
    153
    SECTION CLXI-CXCIX
    Uluka Dutagamana Parva
    306

     

    VOLUME - V

     

    Publisher's Preface v
    SECTION I-X
    Jamvu-Khanda Nirman Parva
    1
    SECTION XI-XII
    Bhumi Parva
    24
    SECTION XIII-XLII
    Bhagavat-Gita Parva
    29
    SECTION XLIII-CXXIV 98

     

    VOLUME - VI

     

    Preface v
    SECTIONS I-XXX
    Dronabhisheka Parva
    1
    SECTIONS XXXI-LXXXIV
    Abhimanyu-vandha Parva
    76
    SECTIONS LXXXV-CLI
    Jayadratha-vadha Parva
    165
    SECTIONS CLII-CLXXXIV
    Ghatotkacha-vadha Parva
    340
    SECTIONS CLXXXV-CCIII
    Drona-vadha Parva
    427

     

    VOLUME - VII

     

    Publisher's Preface  
    KARNA PARVA  
    SECTION I-XCVI 1-268
    SALYA PARVA  
    SECTION I-LXV 1-179
    SAUPTIKA PARVA  
    SECTION I-XVIII 1-41
    STREE PARVA  
    SECTION I-XV
    Jalapradanika Parva
    1
    SECTION XVI-XXVII
    Stree - vilapa Parva
    23

     

    VOLUME - VIII

     

    Publisher's Preface v
    SANTI PARVA (Part I)  
    SECTION I-CXXX
    Rajadharmanusasana Parva
    1
    SECTION CXXXI-CLXXIII
    Apadharmanusasana Parva
    283

     

    VOLUME - IX

     

    SANTI PARVA
    Part II
     
    Preface v
    SECTION CLXXIV-CCCI
    Mokshadharma Parva
    1-377

     

    VOLUME - X

     

    Publisher's Preface v
    SANTI PARVA (Part III)  
    SECTION CCCII-CCCLXV 1-217
    ANUSASANA PARVA (Part I)  
    SECTION I-XXXV
    Anusasanika Parva
    1-162

     

    VOLUME - XI

     

    Publisher's Preface v
    ANUSASANA PARVA (Part II)  
    SECTION XXXVI-CLXVIII
    Anusasanika Parva
    1-397

     

    VOLUME - XII

     

    Publisher's Preface v
    ASWAMEDHA PARVA  
    SECTION I-XV
    Aswamedhika Parva
    1
    SECTION XVI-XCII
    Anugita Parva
    23
    ASRMAVASIKA PARVA  
    SECTION I-XXVIII
    Asramavasa Parva
    1
    SECTION XXIX-XXXVI
    Putradarsana Parva
    44
    SECTION XXXVII-XXXIX
    Naradagamana Parva
    58
    MAUSALA PARVA  
    SECTION I-VIII 1
    MAHAPRASTHANIKA PARVA  
    SECTION I-V 1-7
    SWARGAROHANIKA PARVA  
    SECTION I-VI 1-18

     

    Sample Pages

    Vol-1



    Vol-2



     

     


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