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(Large Size) Devi: The Manifestation of Primordial Female Energy
(Large Size) Devi: The Manifestation of Primordial Female Energy

(Large Size) Devi: The Manifestation of Primordial Female Energy

$1,500.00
  • SKU: ZL39
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Description

Specifications:

  • Dimensions:43 inch x 13.5 inch x 12 inch
  • Weight:26 kg
  • Material:Antiquated Brass Statue
  • This magnificent metal-cast, a stylistic synthesis of India's great arttraditions, represents Devi as she has been conceived in ancient art. Thestatue, though a contemporary work, represents, thus, the continuity ofancient India's great sculptural tradition, rivals the best of medievalbronzes, the Chola and Pala, and is a great master- piece by any parameter.This statue excels the classical art style of South Indian bronzes in thestyle of its features -a sharp well defined nose, angular face, pointedchin, broad forehead, small cute lips, lotus eyes and eye-lashes surmountinglike Kamadeva's or Cupid's bow, in the beauty of form and elegantornamentation. Well shaped breasts with finial like nipples enshrining theirapex, a bottle-neck like narrow belly with mild folds, slender waist andheavy thighs, elegantly cast tall arms coming down to knees and broadcurving shoulders define the exceptional beauty of Devi's form. This statue,cast in a posture of celestial dance, is the finest model of beauty as perIndian aesthetic tradition. The curves and knots of fingers, cast for givingexpression to the desired 'bhava' or emotion, impart to the figure itsexceptional appeal and effects. The figure of the goddess is so life-likethat, while looking at it, one feels that she will step down the pedestaland will begin walking any moment.

    In Indian tradition, Devi, the manifestation of primordial female energy,has often been identified as one or the other of the Puranic deities,usually either as Parvati or as Lakshmi, and sometimes as both. However,before Devi emerged as Parvati or Lakshmi, she has, in scriptural tradition,her own cult also. As this tradition has it, Mahavishnu, soon after thegreat deluge subsided, emerged as a child floating on a fig leaf. Thedismayed Mahavishnu questioned himself as to who he was and whatfor he wasthere. The silence broke and there emerged a voice: 'Sarvam khalvidamevahamnanyadasty sanatanam', that is, 'All that is, it is me. There is nothinglasting but me'. When Vishnu was yet in trance, he saw a female form, Devi,appear before him. She was attended by many powers representing primarilyriches and prosperity, wisdom and intellect and love and womanhood. Thesethree faculties incarnated respectively as Mahalakshmi, Mahasaraswati andParvati. In later Trinity cult, Laksmi got associated with Vishnu, Saraswatiwith Brahma and Parvati with Shiva. Subsequently, there evolved other Deviforms and Mahavidyas, first five, then seven, then nine and then graduallymore than fifty. The number of Mahavidyas was first seven and then ten.

    Later, when there developed Shaivism and Vaishnavism as two devotionalcults, Devi forms, too, despite a single origin, took two different lines,the Shaivite and Vaishnavite. Lakshmi, the custodian of riches andprosperity, came to be the principal Vaishnavite deity and Parvati,representing perfect womanhood and perpetual love, Shaivite. In iconographicrepresentations Parvati got associated with her attributes of Shiva andLaksmi those of Vishnu. Of the two Parvati has been more popular withsculptors and artists. Hence, in art, Devi merged with Parvati. She has beenendowed with a more versatile form, ornamentation and personality. Despitesome Vaishnavite attributes, the Devi form, represented in this statue, isclose to Parvati. As for Vaishnavite attributes, it is said Vishnu onceoffered to serve Shiva as his Shakti and incarnated as Parvati. Obviously,Parvati got associated with her some of Vaishnavite attributes, especiallyhis crown, as here in this statue, consisting of Vaishnava brooch and'Kirtimukha'. She is wearing also on her arms 'Kirtimukha' bracelets. Thetowering crown, with auspicious 'Kirtimukha', is also typical of SouthIndian images.

    This description by Prof. P.C. Jain and Dr. Daljeet. Prof. Jain specializeson the aesthetics of literature and is the author of numerous books onIndian art and culture. Dr. Daljeet is the curator of the Miniature PaintingGallery, National Museum, New Delhi. They have both collaborated together ona number of books.


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